HaBO: Jeweler Identifies Origin of a Pin
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Articles / October 8, 2019

This HaBO request is from Bonessasan, who wants to find this historical romance: I actually remember a lot about this book, just no names (author, character, or places). It’s a historical romance set in England, possibly around the time of William the conqueror. The opening scene has two warrior brothers (Norman? Definitely from what is now France) who have just gotten out of battle and go to the house of a red-headed Saxon woman known to be a whore. While one brother goes up in the loft with the woman, other falls asleep until a Saxon man bursts in and demands the woman’s services. The is a fight and the hero punches the man, accidentally killing him and the woman runs out of the house into a storm only to be struck by lightning. The hero and his brother then go on to the hero’s promised demesne, where the hero marries the lady to secure his claim and to merge the invaders with the conquered in that area. Ultimately, it turns out the Saxon man that died was the lady’s first husband. Also, the are pins that the brothers have that display their family crest. The hero throws his in…

Cowboys, Royals, & More
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Articles / October 8, 2019

Seasons of Sorcery Seasons of Sorcery is $2.49! This is a fantasy anthology with four stories by Jennifer Estep, Grace Draven, Jeffe Kennedy, and Amanda Bouchet. I also made cocktails for this release! My thoughts on the anthology is that it wasn’t bad, but I prefer reading these authors when they have plenty of page length to work. WINTER’S WEB BY JENNIFER ESTEP An assassin at a renaissance faire. What could possibly go wrong? Everything, if you’re Gin Blanco. This Spider is trapped in someone else’s icy web—and it seems like they don’t want her to leave the faire alive . . . A CURSE FOR SPRING BY AMANDA BOUCHET A malevolent spell strangles the kingdom of Leathen in catastrophic drought. Prince Daric must break the curse before his people starve. A once-mighty goddess trapped in a human body might be the key—but saving his kingdom could mean losing all that he loves. THE DRAGONS OF SUMMER BY JEFFE KENNEDY As unofficial consort to the High Queen, former mercenary Harlan Konyngrr faces a challenge worse than looming war and fearsome dragons. His long-held secrets threaten what he loves most—and he must make a choice between vows to two women. A WILDERNESS…

HaBO: War Reporter Heroine Returns Home
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Articles / October 8, 2019

This HaBO comes Michelle, who is hoping to find this contemporary romance: A woman moves back to her small hometown after being away for years and years. She’s a journalist/reporter who spent some time in war-torn Iraq or Iran. She had been in a relationship with her cameraman/photographer, who ended up being killed in a car bombing or something. She was also injured and has PTSD because of what happened. She comes back and gets reacquainted with an old boyfriend of hers from high school or whatever and they realize they still have feelings for each other. I can’t remember if there were any sex scenes, but if there were, they weren’t explicit I don’t think. They were more Debbie Macomber than Linda Lael Miller, you know what I mean? I read it around 2006-07, and it had been published recently. Know this one?

How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse by K. Eason
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Articles / October 8, 2019

A How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse by K. Eason October 8, 2019 · DAW Science Fiction/Fantasy I adored this book, but the title is misleading. As far as I can tell, “multiverse” is an exaggeration. This book is really about how Rory destroys galactic peace. Not even in the whole universe. Just a little bit of it. She does a really great job of it though. This character, and the supporting characters, and the narrator, and the entire book made me happy for every single second of the story and I’m kind of bummed out now that it’s over. The story is told as a history, written by an omniscient third-person narrator who is far from neutral. It’s wonderful. We commence this story with a futuristic version of Sleeping Beauty. Rory, the new princess of Thorne, has a traditional Naming ceremony, to which twelve fairies are invited. The first eleven fairies give her various innocuous gifts – the ability to play the harp for instance, which turns out to be surprisingly useful later on. Naturally the thirteenth fairy shows up and curses her with “finding no comfort in illusion or platitude, and to know truth when you hear it,…